Thursday, February 4, 2016

Ben Franklin Quote S/R

Kendall Jordan
English 9 Honors-5
Smith
2 February, 2016

The Damaging Effects of Finite Safety on Fundamental Liberty
In 1759, founding father Benjamin Franklin stated that temporary safety was not worth the staggering price of relinquishing essential liberty. He argued the point of citizens standing their ground when challenged to abandon privacy.
Franklin’s quote correctly summarizes how it is possible in the modern world for safety, in exchange for liberty, to be extended into invasion of privacy. The government, under the PATRIOT Act, has the right to track citizens’ phone calls and emails, search belongings, and keep track of people's whereabouts, for fear of a threat to the United States. Privacy is crucially essential to the public, as shown in a recent article. A man named Kevin Payne shared a video of a TSA officer patting down his daughter in an indecent manner after she leaves a Capri Sun in her airport carry-on. The 10 year old has a near two minute screening that the father feels is inappropriate and unnecessary, especially for a girl under 12 years old. According to San Diego Tribune, Payne said, “TSA agents made it clear to him that he would be arrested if he tried to interfere with the search of his daughter” (San Diego Tribune). If Payne were to prevent the officer from touching his child, they would take him into custody, violating both his and his daughter’s Fourth Amendment right of protection from unreasonable searches and seizures. Likewise, citizens all over the United States have surrendered their essential liberty at airport security checkpoints in exchange for invasive precautions. However, it can be argued the safety of flights could be worth two minutes of screening and that the father of the video is overreacting. Examples of inadequate security leading to flight emergencies are the terrorist attacks of 9/11. In response, airports introduced more advanced screening systems and tightened flight laws to prevent a similar strike. Also, the Fourth Amendment clearly states, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons...against unreasonable searches and seizures...but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized” (United States Constitution). The airport has approval to search any suspicious person or persons by law. Whenever an airport security alarm sounds, that implies the person passing through has violated a law of aircraft possession, whether it be a pocketknife or a Capri Sun. While valid points arise in these arguments, there is a fine line between precaution and invasion. Although airplane security is used to preserve safety of travelers, the TSA officer in the video clearly violated the young girl’s privacy and personal space.  Although the TSA has a permit to inspect questionable behavior, Franklin points out how it is hard to feel secure when personal boundaries and liberties are neglected. In conclusion, Ben Franklin was undoubtedly correct in stating that temporary safety is never worth surrendering personal liberties.












Works Cited
"Airport Security Repercussions Due to the September 11 Attacks." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2016. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airport_security_repercussions_due_to_the_September_11_attacks>.
Cook, Morgan. "Man Upset over TSA Pat-down of Daughter, 10." The San Diego Union-Tribune. N.p., 4 Jan. 2016. Web. 03 Feb. 2016. <http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2016/jan/04/tsa-10-year-old-girl/>.
"Fourth Amendment - U.S. Constitution - FindLaw." Findlaw. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2016. <http://constitution.findlaw.com/amendment4.html>.
Payne, Kevin. "10 Years Old Girl Traumatized after TSA Agents Pat Her down at the Airport." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2016. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlHT-zzqpB8>.
"September 11 Attacks." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2016. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_11_attacks>.

Wittes, Benjamin. "What Ben Franklin Really Said." Lawfare. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2016.

Monday, October 26, 2015

Kendall Jordan Act 4 S/R Re-Do

Summary Response Outline

Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • William Shakespeare’s Othello examines the power of manipulation and the domination of anger in one’s life.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
    • In Act 4, Iago provides Othello with proof of Desdemona and Cassio’s “affair.”
    • Iago’s plot to obtain lieutenancy has become profitable, but now he is determined to murder Cassio according to Othello’s wishes. By executing small steps working up to the overall scheme, Iago will stop at nothing to possess what he desires. His rage causes him to manipulate everyone around him in order for everything to go his way.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • As Othello by William Shakespeare advances and the plot grows more ominous, the manipulation and fury within the story demonstrates its command over the characters.

Response:
  • Topic sentence:
    • Othello by William Shakespeare properly depicts the way anger can grasp and control a person’s sanity because of the lengths Iago goes to in order to get his way.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • In order for Othello to defy Cassio, Iago must convince Othello Cassio and Desdemona are enthralled in a forbidden intimacy. After Desdemona misplaces her handkerchief in a rush, Iago’s wife Emilia picks it up and presents it to Iago. Taking pleasure in following his scheme, he plants the handkerchief in Cassio’s room. This leads Othello to believe Desdemona has given it to him while they are having an affair. Bianca, Cassio’s prostitute girlfriend, is naturally jealous and angry, causing her to confront him about it.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).
      • As Bianca bellows at Cassio, “Let the devil and his dam haunt you! What did you mean by that same handkerchief you gave me even now? I was a fine fool to take it...this is some minx’s token, and I must take out the work! There, give it to your hobbyhorse. Wheresoever you had it, I’ll take out no work on ‘t” (Shakespeare 4.1.167-174).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Bianca finds this unfamiliar handkerchief in Cassio’s room, and instinctively, she assumes it is from another girlfriend. She is overcome with displeasure and throws it at him, saying she won’t tolerate him having another “minx” or “hobbyhorse.” Othello sees this confrontation and immediately recognizes the handkerchief passed down to him from his mother, the same handkerchief he gave to Desdemona as a sign of never-ending love. Because Bianca found it in Cassio’s bed, Othello realizes Desdemona must have left it there, meaning she was in his room. Instead, Iago went out of his way to plant it in Cassio’s room. His manipulation caused Othello to develop resentment for his beloved wife.
  • Counterclaim 1:
    • Set-up
      • Although Iago’s anger is a main point in the play, he is not unceasingly full of hate and he doesn’t always use manipulation.
      • After Othello slaps Desdemona, she is filled with ambivalence and confusion about why he is upset. Iago calms her down and reassures her that Othello is stressed about being called to Venice.
    • Evidence:
      • As Iago assures Desdemona, “I pray you be content. ‘Tis but his humor. The business of the state does him offense, and he does chide with you...Go in and weep not. All things shall be well” (Shakespeare 4.2.194-201).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago supports Desdemona while she goes through a rough period with Othello. She has no clue why he is agitated with her or why he lashed out and struck her. She needs someone to open up to, so she confides in Iago and Emilia. Iago is loyal and sweet as he offers advice and assures her everything is going to be okay. He explains Othello’s stress with work and assures her that is the only reason he is on edge. Therefore, due to the fact that Iago was sweet and considerate towards Desdemona, his constant inner resentment is contradicted with his actions.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • A common view is Iago is not always overwhelmed with anger and the urge to manipulate. Some argue he can be compassionate and is not always focused on revenge.
    • This way of making sense of the position is reasonable due to the way he was courteous to Desdemona while she was weeping. It is undeniable that he did help her compose herself after Othello slapped her in front of Lodovico.
    • Despite this commendable point, it is more complicated than that. If Iago were to follow his master plan to gain the trust of Othello and kill Cassio, he needs Desdemona to be kept in the dark. If he had explained to her how Othello thought she was having an affair with his ex-lieutenant, she would’ve found a way to work it out and convince him she was loyal. If Iago had played it off as a “stressed with work” thought, she would not think of it as the important situation it is. Although Iago does act gracious with Desdemona in Act 4, he is simply influencing her thoughts and manipulating her for his own benefit.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In conclusion, Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare identifies the power of anger and manipulation and the ability it has to seize a person’s thoughts and actions.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Kendall Jordan Act 4 S/R

Summary Response Outline

Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • William Shakespeare’s Othello examines the power of manipulation and how anger can dominate one’s life.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
    • In Act 4, Iago provides Othello with proof that Desdemona and Cassio are having an affair.
    • Iago’s plot to obtain lieutenancy has paid off, but now he is determined to murder Cassio according to Othello’s wishes. By executing small steps working up to the larger scheme, Iago will stop at nothing to get what he wants.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • As Othello by William Shakespeare advances and the plot grows darker and darker, the manipulation and fury within the story demonstrates the command it has over the characters.

Response:
  • Topic sentence:
    • Othello by William Shakespeare properly depicts how anger can grasp and control a person’s sanity because of the lengths Iago goes to in order to get his way.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • In order to get Othello to turn against Cassio, Iago must convince Othello that Cassio and Desdemona are having a secret affair. After Desdemona drops her handkerchief in a rush, Iago’s wife Emilia picks it up and gives it to Iago. Taking pleasure in following his scheme, he then plants it in Cassio’s room so Othello believes Desdemona has given it to him while they are having an affair. Bianca, Cassio’s prostitute girlfriend, is naturally jealous and confronts him about it.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).
      • As Bianca laments to Cassio, “Let the devil and his dam haunt you! What did you mean by that same handkerchief you gave me even now? I was a fine fool to take it...this is some minx’s token, and I must take out the work! There, give it to your hobbyhorse. Wheresoever you had it, I’ll take out no work on ‘t” (Shakespeare 4.1.167-174).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Bianca finds this unfamiliar handkerchief in Cassio’s room after a night at his place. Instinctively, she assumes it is from another girlfriend that he might have and throws it at him, saying it is a token of another flirtatious girl. Othello sees this confrontation and immediately recognizes the handkerchief that was passed down to him from his mother. This is the same handkerchief that he gave to Desdemona as a sign of neverending love, and because Bianca found it in Cassio’s bed, Othello realizes that Desdemona must’ve put it there. Instead, Iago went out of his way to plant it in Cassio’s room. This is a stellar example of how engulfed with anger Iago is.
  • Counterclaim 1:
    • Set-up
      • Although Iago’s anger is a main point in the play, he isn’t unceasingly full of anger and hate.
      • After Othello slaps Desdemona, she is filled with ambivalence and confusion about why he is upset. Iago calms her down and reassures her that Othello is just stressed about being called back to war. He aids her in ceasing her crying and acts as a support for her.
    • Evidence:
      • As Iago assures Desdemona, “I pray you be content. ‘Tis but his humor. The business of the state does him offense, and he does chide with you...Go in and weep not. All things shall be well” (Shakespeare 4.2.194-201).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago supports Desdemona while she is going through a rough period of time with Othello. She has no clue why he is agitated with her or why he lashed out and struck her. She needs someone to talk to, so she opens up to Iago and Emilia. Iago is nothing but loyal and sweet as he gives her advice and assures her that everything is going to be okay. Therefore, due to the fact that Iago was sweet and considerate towards Desdemona, his constant inner resentment is contradicted with his actions.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • A common view is that Iago is not always overwhelmed with anger and resentment. Some say he is a nice person sometimes and he is not always focused on revenge.
    • This way of making sense of the position makes a degree of sense because of the way he was courteous to Desdemona while she was weeping. It is undeniable that he did help her compose herself after he slapped her in front of Lodovico.
    • Despite this commendable point, it is more complicated than that. If Iago were to follow his master plan to gain the trust of Othello and kill Cassio, he needs Desdemona to be kept in the dark. If he had explained to her that Othello thought she was having an affair with his ex-lieutenant, she would’ve found a way to work it out and convince him that she was loyal. If Iago just played it off as a “stressed with work” thought, she would not think of it as the important situation it is. Although Iago does act gracious with Desdemona in Act 4, he is just influencing her thoughts for his own benefit.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In conclusion, Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare identifies the power of anger and the ability it has to seize a person’s thoughts and actions.


Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Kendall Jordan and Andy Butscher Othello Act 1 Re-re do 9-23

Summary Response Outline

Summary: Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
Othello by William Shakespeare illustrates a story of revenge, jealousy, and the effect anger has on a person.
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
Act One follows Iago and Roderigo as they each seek revenge on Othello. Iago desired the position as his lieutenant, but Othello overlooked him and gave him a job as an “ancient.” Roderigo is in love with Desdemona, who happens to be Othello’s lover and wife.

  • Explanation of ideas
Both of the characters feel like they have been wronged by this man and that they must have revenge upon him.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
In Othello, by William Shakespeare, the Moor betrays Iago and Roderigo unknowingly by taking away the position that Iago wanted and the girl that Roderigo loved.

Response: Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
Othello by William Shakespeare portrays the results of anger and the extent one goes to get revenge because of jealousy due to hatred and beliefs.
  • Claim 1: Jealousy and anger are clearly shown in two different situations.
    • Set-up The main characters, Iago and Roderigo, both feel they have been cheated by Othello. Iago is jealous of a man named Cassio because Othello appointed Cassio to be his lieutenant, even though Iago was a much more experienced, loyal option. Iago states, “‘In personal suit to make me his lieutenant...For ‘Certes,’ says he, ‘I have already chose my officer’’” (Shakespeare 1.1 10-18).
    • Evidence: Iago desired a position of lieutenant to Othello, who was a great, Venetian commander. Instead of considering Iago for the position, Othello chose Michael Cassio, a mathematician from Florence.
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim -  Iago felt betrayed and hurt, so he swore to get revenge on Othello.
  • Counterclaim 1: Iago appears to be a loyal and trustworthy servant to Othello throughout Act One.
    • Set-up Iago is Othello’s “ancient” and he must attend to him in battle. Therefore, he is very pleasant and friendly towards Othello. Although it may seem like he genuinely cares for Othello’s well-being, his kindness is just a part of his twisted plan to get revenge.
    • Evidence: Iago tries to warn Othello about Brabantio wanting to divorce Othello and Desdemona. As Iago says, “‘And spoke such scurvy and provoking terms against your Honor, that with the little godliness I have. Are you fast married? Be assured of this, that the magnifico is much beloved... As double as the Duke’s. He will divorce you...”  (Shakespeare 1.2 9-16).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim This warning seems friendly, making it appear that  Iago is completely loyal to Othello. Iago tells him to be watchful and vigilant because if he isn’t, Desdemona may divorce him.

  • What are the strengths/flaws of this argument? Rebuttal progression
A common position is that Iago a trustworthy ancient to Othello. This view may seem reasonable because Iago and Othello seem to trust each other, but Iago is planning to use Othello’s trust against him. In the text, Iago verbally plots to manipulate Othello’s emotions and thoughts to redress his betrayal of Iago. Iago appears to be an ally to Othello, but he is just wearing a mask.

  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
William Shakespeare’s Othello demonstrates how jealousy and anger can control a person’s life and the choices they make out of hatred.

Citations:
Works Cited
Shakespeare, William. Othello. N.p.: Folger Shakespeare Library, 1993. Print.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Kendall Jordan and Christine Attai Act 2 Summary Response

Summary Response Outline

Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • Othello by William Shakespeare delves into the power of manipulation and how its properties can be used against a victim.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
    • As conflicts rise in the play, Iago, the primary antagonist, applies manipulative tactics through Cassio and Roderigo.
    • Throughout the story, Iago persuades both men to complete tasks that prove to have outcomes that help execute the initial steps in his revenge scheme against Othello.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • Clearly, when manipulation is present such as in Shakespeare’s play, Othello, its power, as discovered by readers, can be used to change the life of another.

Response:
  • Topic sentence:
    • Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays manipulation because it can lead to a negative result for the victim or victims.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • Iago is the primary antagonist in the play. He is an ancient of Othello, Iago’s master who is also a widely acclaimed commander. After Othello selects Michael Cassio, a young and inexperienced soldier, to succeed as his officer, Iago develops a hatred for both Othello and Cassio. In his scheme to gain revenge over both men, Iago plans to intoxicate Cassio in Cyprus before his nightly guarding shift commences.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).
      • Iago expands on this plan as he depicts, “If I can fasten but one cup upon him with that which he hath drunk tonight already, He’ll be full of quarrel and offense as my mistress’ dog...Now, ‘mongst this flock of drunkards am I to put our Cassio in some action that may offend the isle. But here they come. If consequence do but approve my dream, my boat sails freely both with wind and stream” (Shakespeare 2.3. 85).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago, who is aware of Cassio’s sensitivity to alcohol, plans to convince him to drink a glass of wine before his shift. This will not only enable Iago to manipulate him, but also give Othello an additional reason to ridicule Cassio. Cassio, being very reactant to the wine, will become mentally weak upon drinking. Iago then can use Cassio’s vulnerable nature to instigate a quarrel in which he will offend the isle of Cyprus. As a result of this immoral behavior, Othello will see the need to penalize Cassio, and will thus be adventitiously beneficial for Iago by advancing his revenge plan to the next phase.
  • Counterclaim 1:
    • Set-up
      • However, Iago occasionally incorrectly portrays manipulation. One instance is when he defends Cassio in front of Othello after Cassio engages in a fight.
      • While Cassio was drunk, Roderigo initiated a cataclysm. Othello walks in on the scene and Cassio is caught in the middle of the act. Ashamed and obfuscated, he asks Iago to recall and explain the event. Instead of delivering the story in a manner that describes Cassio as the scapegoat, Iago defends Cassio’s honor.
    • Evidence:
      • Iago explains to Othello, “I’d rather have this tongue cut from my mouth than it should do offense to Michael Cassio. Yet I persuade myself, to speak the truth shall nothing wrong him” (Shakespeare 2.3 236-239).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago supports Cassio to prove his loyalty to him, claiming he would rather be hurt than take away his honor. He speaks only to please Othello and extenuate the situation he walked into. Iago uses a more objective approach to explaining the situation and thus eliminates his manipulative tactics around Othello. Therefore, because Iago spoke to Othello directly about the situation and made no effort to manipulate Othello, manipulation is incorrectly portrayed.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • At first glance, one could argue based upon certain portions of the play that Iago is faithful to Cassio and that he wants Cassio to keep his position as lieutenant.
    • We can not deny that Iago defends Cassio in a public matter in front of his commander as well as explains the quarrel in such a way that would not harm Cassio. At multiple points in the story, such as the clash highlighting Cassio, Iago is withdrawn and simply observes the events. His actions do not directly start the physical conflicts.
    • However, it is more complicated than that. Iago deliberately manipulated Cassio and then acted as if he had done nothing wrong. This was to create his desired result, which is the swift removal of Cassio’s title. As a result, Othello and Cassio thought that he was trustworthy when he was really a twisted liar. Iago manipulated Cassio so that he would feel tense from his offered dosage of alcohol. The wine can be thought of as Iago. Iago’s negative influence and manipulative tactics are encompassed in the wine, and once Cassio ingests the wine, he ingests all of Iago’s negative power. He becomes Iago’s fool, and is henceforth under Iago’s control. Although Cassio’s actions are not directly controlled by Iago, his behavior in front of Othello is directly linked back to Iago himself. Therefore, Iago’s actions and words expressed in front of Cassio and Othello are all different representations of his manipulative characteristics.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In conclusion, William Shakespeare’s Othello demonstrates the power of manipulation and how it can create a disadvantageous outcome for the targeted subjects.